Lots of Bytes
When you start talking about lots of bytes, you get into prefixes like kilo, mega and giga, as in kilobyte, megabyte and gigabyte (also shortened to K, M and G, as in Kbytes, Mbytes and Gbytes or KB, MB and GB). The following table shows the multipliers:

Name
Abbr.
Size
Kilo
K
2^10 = 1,024
Mega
M
2^20 = 1,048,576
Giga
G
2^30 = 1,073,741,824
Tera
T
2^40 = 1,099,511,627,776
Peta
P
2^50 = 1,125,899,906,842,624
Exa
E
2^60 = 1,152,921,504,606,846,976
Zetta
Z
2^70 = 1,180,591,620,717,411,303,424
Yotta
Y
2^80 = 1,208,925,819,614,629,174,706,176

You can see in this chart that kilo is about a thousand, mega is about a million, giga is about a billion, and so on. So when someone says, "This computer has a 2 gig hard drive," what he or she means is that the hard drive stores 2 gigabytes, or approximately 2 billion bytes, or exactly 2,147,483,648 bytes. How could you possibly need 2 gigabytes of space? When you consider that one CD holds 650 megabytes, you can see that just three CDs worth of data will fill the whole thing! Terabyte databases are fairly common these days, and there are probably a few petabyte databases floating around the Pentagon by now.